John Taylor
Dr. Sing's Philosophy....
 
I have trained with Dr. Sing since the age of 14, I am now almost 30. I threw 235 in high school with the old javelin and have a 73.30 meter personal best with the new javelin. He got more out of me than I could ever dream, and I still believe a further throw is coming. Dr. Sing has a tremendous knowledge, not only of the technical aspects of the javelin throw, but a huge appreciation for the history of the sport, its roots, and its tradition from the Finns, Russians, Czechs, Latvians, Poles, Brits, and many more. At 5'6" and 175 lbs., Dr. Sing threw near 270 feet with the old javelin, using his tremendous speed and remarkable technical precision. He is a true believer in genetic ability combined with a technical base built upon throwing correctly. A solid running position, an accelerated relaxed runway approach with a fluid dynamic transition from the drawback phase to the penultimate phase of the approach. Dr. Sing preaches a very aggressive penultimate step with a very dynamic, plyometric bound into the throw, maintaining terrific upper body position throughout this transition with the shoulders closed, the hip rotated back, and a very long shoulder placement. As it progresses from this point, a great recovery stride of the left side, while maintaining a powerful position of the right knee and hip with the throwing arm left behind. As the right foot recovers, the left hip and blocking side is prepared for the bracing action, with the right foot, hip turning up and forward. Once the blocking action is in motion, the throwing shoulder rotates up and forward with the throwing hand still behind the throwing side. This creates a powerful separation. As the action of the blocking side creates the lift, the throwing side is accelerated forward PULLING the javelin into an explosive reactive stretch reflex which is further created by the contractive impulse of the lat and shoulder with a ballistic throwing action through the grip and point of the javelin. The follow through and finish is directly place through the point of the shaft for a precise striking action into the implement. This is the theory that I have learned and there are many variations on how one gets there. Dr. Sing has trained, thrown with, coached and studied some of the greatest javelin throwers of all time and has passed some amazing knowledge on to others, including myself. I am always happy to share with those who ask these types of questions on this forum. I wish there were more of these types on intriguing dialogues to participate in.