Pukstys Jav Tips

 

Keep the tip down near the head. Make sure this is happening until your plant leg touches the ground. Many throwers try to throw the grip of the javelin. Think about throwing the point of the spear. This way everything in between your hand and the point is aligned. Think of it like a flashlight. You control the spot were the light shines with your hand....throw the jav through the light beam

 

 

You get lift by staying behind your plant better. Usually young throwers will go after the spear hard in order for more power. To throw real far you must catch and pull the javelin harder, not strike past your block. You can see a javelin is released behind the plant leg on long throws. This is the lift you get from the plant. Not only do you get speed from stopping, you get the lift from the opposite action of the leg going down, everything else   rises.(For every action there is opposite reaction) So try keeping your chest    higher and get your plant a little further out than usual. But don't take action on the spear until you block hits the ground. This should automatically give you some height without aiming high. Let the legs work first.

 

 

There is no drive off of his right leg, this would put him to forward. From observing Jan warm-up over the years I noticed that when he does easy throws he tries to stay behind the chest and almost back on his right foot at release. He tries to get the javelin to float and land flat. This means he is not working on his throw, but he is working on the leg positions

I don't throw to hard in training, but    I always try to stay behind my plant.

I always try to feel that solid left side, and then strike past my face. If  I chase it too much I will not feel the shock of the left, just a sort of slowing mechanism.

 

To prepare for nationals, I would concentrate on specific ability, and do a little less general stuff. This means to polish up on your run-up, your shoulder flexibility, your plant etc. Then you can do sprints, plyos, and weights. I would do plyos twice a week. Sprints twice a week, and lift 3 or 4 days. Don't do to many different types of lifts, just do your core lifts. Keep reps between 2 and 4, and weight medium to high. But get rest the last week before the meet. Just work on specific weaknesses you may have, and set goals  to reach

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cross-overs: Take some barriers, the barriers should be about 2 or 3 inches high, and    place them on the ground wide enough where you have to work hard to clear each    barrier during a cross over run. I will do repeat cross steps over these barriers to improve my ability to drive off each step. When doing a cross step, try to run tall with your center of mass, hip area, leading the way. You must think of moving that mass forward, not just moving the legs.

Two times a week you should do about 10 x 30 meters of this resisted cross step. It will help you pull your lead leg and then push off, and then you will need to push off your    following leg (right leg on a right hand thrower) to keep momentum. Then when you do it without any weight you will be more capable in your cross step power. Do it for 6 weeks

 

Zelezny cupped his wrists during the pullover. He holds his hands as if flexing his    forearms. This creates a shorter pullover, but is technically more sound.

anytime he throws a med ball, or other ball, he uses the cupped wrist

When doing a pull over with the new grip, remember to use the armpit part of your shoulder more than usual. This will develop your ability to have a high arm release, which if done right, gives you lift on the spear.

 

Med Ball Throws

Two-hand overhead forward throw

            - standing with feet shoulder with apart

- standing with block leg forward

- kneeling on something soft, for more shoulder isolation

- laying on the back, coming up to sit-up pos. & throwing: helps stomach muscles

Three step and 5 step run-ups

            - sets of 5 or 6 for 10 to 20 repetitions

            - heavy early in season

            - during season…light only

            - example: start with 5kg, do about 6 diff throws. Every 6 wks go 1kg lighter on

              5-4-3-2-1


 

Developing some extra power in your throwing arm. First you must get in some throwing form by doing two arm med ball throws for several weeks.

The stress of one arm work should not be jumped into. So lay some ground work first.

In the weight room you can begin to do a one arm pullover with dumbbell's. At first use light weight to get the feel for it. The best way will be to use an incline bench, with the top of the bench at the top of your head. You need room to do the pullover. It is best to simply do a straight up and down motion over your head. Elbow bent a little. Go back as far as you can, feel the stretch, and pull it back to the top of your head. 5 x 10 is good to start, then lower reps every 3 weeks, and raise the weight. Don't go heavier than 45 to 55 pounds. Do it twice a week. On the field you can do some one arm ball throws with a heavy ball. Use a three pound ball, into a wall, and throw easy for repetitions. It's best to use a ball which can bounce a little so you can catch and release quickly. Don't try to throw too hard here.    The stress is too high, just be firm and work 5 x 12 reps. For those of you who can handle big weight, start with a 6 pound ball, and work down in weight.    If you are good with the heavy ball, than stop and go to lighter balls, strength is not your problem, it is speed. But you can build a nice base with the heavy stuff. Every three weeks you should go to a lighter weight. But still keep your reps above 8. If you don't have any weighted balls, you can try tennis balls filled with a variety of weights, and taped. If you use lead, it can get nice and heavy. The lightest ones can be filled with sand. The ball throws are a simple pattern to follow for improvement. It is like weight lifting. Build a base with slow movements and high reps, and get lighter and faster in time. The most important thing to know is don't try to kill the heavy ball. It will not help you. Only tear something. But if you throw as hard as you can without forcing the throw. Than you will be O.K. Once you get down to the near baseball weight.

 

Standing Throws Date: Sat May 9 22:20:10 1998
Hello boys, I will offer you insight on why you don't throw much better with the help of a run-up. To give you an idea, I have thrown about 180 feet from a stand, and that's pushing it. I could do better but my technique would have to break down in order to get more distance. I have thrown 285'10" and to me standing throws don't mean much. The technique needed to generate force, for standing throws, and the power you get from a run, a reaction force, are different. It is complex in accomplishing the idea, but the fact is you guys don't do a good job of using your block to set up your throw. Zelezny is the best at it. He doesn't throw far at all from a stand. The block will create a sort of jarring effect that creates a force threw the body and helps you create speed. You have to keep your arm back at the moment of impact of your plant though. What you guys are doing is trying to throw past a plant and your throw becomes a strike or a push after the spear. To throw far with a run, you must still pull the spear. It takes the right leg to turn into, the left block leg, and your right arm to stay back until the block is solid first. Zelezny drops the right knee into a straight left which gives him great torque, and then he pulls up over his plant, but the jav is released from behind the left heel. The plant gives the spear the lift. He doesn't chase it, it is already gone. So to help with throwing from a run-up, try to let the plant hit first and stay at an angle behind it and will lock then you can pull the trigger. There is more to it, but I would have to show you in person.Tom Pukstys
Jeff, You make some great observations. Like I said before, the left leg makes the power for zelezny, there is no drive off of his right leg, this would put him to forward. From observing Jan warm-up over the years I noticed that when he does easy throws he tries to stay behind the chest and almost back on his right foot at release. He tries to get the javelin to float and land flat. This means he is not working on his throw, but he is working on the leg positions. Or staying behind his left. I have had the problem of breaking down technically from a full run-up, but at the time could kill a five step throw. I worked on planting all the time but, not on how my right foot worked. when I started to drop the right foot in like Jan, I was able to maintain a plant even at high speed, and throw further. I don't throw to hard in training, but I always try to stay behind my plant. I know it may not fly as far as it could, with a big strike, but I know it works from a full run. So I practice full runs without throwing. And I try to keep positions in training throws no mater what the distance. I always try to feel that solid left side, and then strike past my face. If I chase it too much I will not feel the shock of the left, just a sort of slowing mechanism. Please ask more questions if this is totally unclear. I can explain some more. Tom